Author Archives: Hajime Sudo

The end of the MBA journey

Hajime-Sudo,Perugia-MBA-stuHajime Sudo is a Japanese student on Bradford University School of Management’s full time MBA in Italy based at the University of Perugia.  He is on the FT’s MBA blogging panel where he regularly shares his experiences as an MBA student.  Read his latest blog.

Two weeks ago I completed and submitted my MBA dissertation at the Bradford University School of Management. My MBA journey , which started in Italy last October, is about to come to a close; I have just until the end of this month.

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Expanding people’s choices …..

Hajime-Sudo,Perugia-MBA-stuHajime Sudo is a Japanese student on Bradford University School of Management’s full time MBA in Italy based at the University of Perugia.  He is on the FT’s MBA blogging panel where he regularly shares his experiences as an MBA student.  Read his latest blog.

At the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), I am applying everything I learnt from the Bradford-Perugia MBA study.

When analyzing Indonesia from macro and micro economic viewpoints, it is apparent that Indonesia has continuously expanded year after year.

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The beginning of my Indonesian internship

Hajime-Sudo,Perugia-MBA-stuHajime Sudo is a Japanese student on Bradford University School of Management’s full time MBA in Italy based at the University of Perugia. He is on the FT’s MBA blogging panel where he regularly shares his experiences as an MBA student. Read his latest blog Continue reading

My MBA continues with an internship in Indonesia

Hajime-Sudo,Perugia-MBA-stuHajime Sudo is a Japanese student on Bradford University School of Management’s full time MBA in Italy based at the University of Perugia. He is on the FT’s MBA blogging panel where he regularly shares his experiences as an MBA student. Read his latest blog here.

Putting MBA theory into practice

Hajime-Sudo,Perugia-MBA-stuHajime Sudo is a Japanese student on Bradford University School of Management’s full time MBA in Italy based at the University of Perugia. He is on the FT’s MBA blogging panel where he regularly shares his experiences as an MBA student.

Hajime’s most recent blogs have been about how he is now beginning to put the MBA theory he is learning into practice. On a visit to an eco-sustainable Italian company with his fellow MBA classmates he learnt how creative thinking is crucial for increasing productivity and effectiveness, which he believes will help him to support Japan’s recovery from the recent earthquake when he goes back to his home country.

Over the Easter vacation, a visit from an old friend from home who is a professional manager gave him the opportunity to discuss what he was learning about business strategy with someone who is putting it into practice on a daily basis.

Hajime is now preparing to finish the last few modules of the MBA programme before embarking on an internship with an Italian company, which he will base his management project on. He will be working in a finance role and plans to explore new ways of bringing the principles of sustainability to accounting. He is now starting to think about his career in an innovative way.

Track Hajime’s progress throughout his MBA through his blogs at http://blogs.ft.com/mba-blog/author/hajimesudo/#axzz1f0t0QPoQ

Is marriage strategic?

Wedding ringsThe latest module on the Bradford University School of Management MBA in Perugia, Italy, is Strategic Management. As part of it, the module leader Deborah Allcock, asked us to discuss the question ‘Is marriage strategic?’ It seemed an odd question at first but it really got us thinking about management strategies and how the concept of marriage translates in business.

Some of my fellow students, including managers from Italian public companies, said that marriage should be all about natural love, whereas others insisted that marriage should be a strategic decision. Those who argued the latter believed that considerations such as future career and the possibility of divorce should be taken into account before entering in to marriage.

I sat between the two opinions – I think marriage per se should be based on love but that love can collaborate strategically with life planning.

We looked at Italy’s successful sector during the module of Manufacturing Systems and Supply-Chain Design by Flavio Tonelli. Italy’s ‘Golden Triangle’ of Northern cities (Milan, Turin and Genoa) is home to many headquarters and factories of famous global companies such as Ferrari. This was one of the reasons that I chose Bradford’s MBA in Perugia because it gave me the opportunity to gain management expertise whilst being able to see its application in the Italian manufacturing industry, which is similar to that of my home country of Japan.

I attended a lecture by Flavio Tonelli, a Professor from the University of Genoa, who explained the different manufacturing systems among different countries and cultures. Toyota’s system focuses on being effective whilst not producing much waste, which enables them to maintain equivalent productivity with fewer employees. In Japan, the 5S practice contributes to significantly reducing production time, whilst the practice of Kaizen continuously improves and maintains a sophisticated production system that makes reliable products.

In India, a large number of global companies explore and outsource important roles with regard to manufacturing processes. Currently their economic growth is outstanding. Almost all US companies are superior to planning and control before they launch the operation. Furthermore, German firms are proud of stable assembly lines based on reliable machines and materials.

Flavio Tonelli investigated not only different types of manufacturing systems design but also their background and global cultural difference. In Italy, they have a unique manufacturing system design based on their culture. From my own viewpoint, the Italian manufacturing system may not be able to exist without considering coffee and tea. They believe that they can enhance effectiveness by communicating more effectively over a café espresso or cappuccino during break times. Many Italian people also spend much of their leisure time in coffee shops, relaxing with others. It can be said that productivity in Italian companies could be rising by switching between work and refreshing.

While it has not been proven that this ‘coffee culture’ motivates Italian employees to work more productively, I am convinced that the country’s manufacturing system cannot be accomplished without this typical Italian culture.

This brings me back to the question ‘Is marriage strategic?’ Like the Italian manufacturing sector, successful business is half based on the love of what you do and half based on the strategy behind it. One cannot exist without the other – businesses based solely on passion cannot be successful just as those based solely on strategy cannot.

Keep up to date with Hajime’s experiences on our MBA in Italy on the FT’s MBA blog here http://blogs.ft.com/mba-blog/author/hajimesudo

The journey of an international MBA student: inspired inside and outside the classroom

FT-MBA-blog4Hajime Sudo is a Japanese student on Bradford University School of Management’s full time MBA based at the University of Perugia in Italy. He recently just joined the FT’s MBA blogging panel.

This week’s blog from Hajime is about his sightseeing trip to Sansepolcro, the birthplace of Luca Pacioli ‘the father of accounting’. The timely trip came just before starting his MBA modules in business economics and business accounting.

He talks about how he is inspired by studying in the region where ancient accountancy practices were devised and learning about how these original ideas have shaped the way things are done today in the context of the current global economy.

Track Hajime’s progress throughout his MBA as he blogs his experiences at http://blogs.ft.com/mba-blog/author/hajimesudo/#axzz1f0t0QPoQ

The journey of an international MBA student: experiences in and outside the classroom

Bradford-MBA-students-in-PeHajime Sudo is a Japanese student on Bradford University School of Management’s full time MBA based at the University of Perugia in Italy. He recently just joined the FT’s MBA blogging panel.

In the second and third instalments of his journey, Hajime shares his experiences of two fundamental aspects of MBA study – operations management and people management – inside and outside the classroom.

He gives a student perspective on managing MBA study around social engagements and learning about a new culture.

Track Hajime’s progress throughout his MBA as he blogs his experiences at http://blogs.ft.com/mba-blog/author/hajimesudo/#axzz1f0t0QPoQ

From Japan to Perugia, a very different experience

Hajime Sudo is a Japanese student on Bradford University School of Management’s full time MBA based at the University of Perugia in Italy. He has just joined the FT’s MBA blogging panel.

His first blog in the series is on what he has learnt so far about Italian business culture. He tells how a dinner at a friend’s house helped him realise the value of the Italian family culture for business. Despite losing potential revenue during down time in the middle of the day, businesses and retailers’ focus on family relationships translates into quality relationships with customers.

Read the full blog here http://blogs.ft.com/mba-blog/2011/11/09/from-japan-to-perugia-a-very-different-experience/#ixzz1ds0gSgL2