Category Archives: Legal

Equality at work - the media is discussing the wrong issues?

Posted by on Monday, February 28, 2011

By Jessica Guth, Lecturer in Law at The School Over the last few of weeks I have watched the news stories unfold. First there was the uproar over Sky Sports’ commentators about a female lineswoman, then claims that the TV presenters on ‘Loose Women’ are just as sexist and then jibes about Mexicans and cars… Read More »

Votes for prisoners: Is it one rule for governments and nations and another for businesses?

Posted by on Tuesday, February 22, 2011

MPs have voted overwhelmingly to continue denying prisoners the right to vote. Apparently, prisoners have ‘broken their contact with society’ and this entitles society to further isolate prisoners, most of whom would probably not seek to exercise a right to vote even if they had it.  Most will also be released back into the community… Read More »

Solicitors & barristers – and law students: isn’t it time they met?

Posted by on Thursday, September 16, 2010

There is no reason why a law student need ever come into contact with a solicitor or barrister at any point in their academic career. As Head of Bradford University Law School, I find this an interesting conundrum. A recent chance conversation about how involved medical practitioners were in the training of students from an… Read More »

Triesman and Duchess of York: careless talk cost them their privacy

Posted by on Tuesday, May 25, 2010

What do Lord Triesman and the Duchess of York have in common?  There may be several things, but the obvious one is their embarrassment at having been caught on tape saying things which, when released into the public arena, cause them damage. Lord Triesman felt compelled to resign as Chairman of the Football Association last… Read More »

Legal rights for voters who couldn’t vote in UK elections

Posted by on Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Official election monitors from Commonwealth countries were at the UK General Election last week, presumably hoping for hints as to how to run free elections efficiently.  Instead they were shocked and believed the integrity of the result was at risk because the system is based on trust rather than security and proper identity checks, according… Read More »

Trial without jury

Posted by on Tuesday, February 23, 2010

This year, the British legal system entered its newest and one of its most controversial chapters; a criminal trial without a jury.  This trial is the first Crown Court case in England and Wales to be heard by a judge alone using powers under Sections 44 and 46 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003, which… Read More »

Time to bin the super injunction

Posted by on Monday, February 8, 2010

Some interesting legal points come out of the John Terry affair. First, it seems that, eventually, the High Court found, by lifting the injunction, that the freedom of the press to report under Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights trumped John Terry’s Article 8 right to privacy. Much of the discussion here… Read More »

Learning from donkeys – in Nigeria

Posted by on Monday, February 1, 2010

I am writing this from Lagos in Nigeria.  It is a bustling city with many people trying to go about their everyday life but often thwarted because of lack of infrastructure.  The electricity supply is sporadic, except to those wealthy enough to be able to afford auxiliary generators. Its newspapers talk of ‘a government policy… Read More »